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Learning Lab: Search Strategies I

1. Find EBSCO and ProQuest databases for academic journal articles

A. Go to the Phillips Library home page. What is the name of the page on the library web site for starting searches in EBSCO or ProQuest Databases?

B. Go to the "Search" page on the Phillips Library website. What is the name of the search box for searching all EBSCO databases or all ProQuest Databases?

C.  True or False - It is possible to search all EBSCO and all ProQuest databases at same time.

A. The "Search" page is the place to start searches in EBSCO or ProQuest Databases.

B. "Articles:  Quick Topic Search" is the name of the search box for searching all EBSCO and ProQuest.

C.  False.  Select a tab to search either all EBSCO databases OR all ProQuest Databases.

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2. Use limits for peer-reviewed articles and full text

A.  Enter a search in all EBSCO databases. On the search results page, select the limits for "Full text" and "Scholarly (peer reviewed)".

B.  Enter a search in all ProQuest databases.  On the search results page, select the limits for "Full text" and "Peer reviewed".

A.  On the EBSCO search results page, in the left column, there are the limits for "Full text" and "Scholarly (peer reviewed)".

 

B.  On the ProQuest search results, under the search box, there are the limits for "Full text" and "Scholarly (peer reviewed)".

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3. Identify the organization of results lists and records in the results

A.  In EBSCO on a search results page, find the default sort order for records and the choices for changing the order by date of publication.

B.  In ProQuest on a search results page, find the default sort order for records and the choices for changing the order by date of publication.

A. In EBSCO, the default order of records is relevance.

B. In ProQuest, the default order of records is relevance.  To order by date of publication, choose from the drop down list.

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4. Use the cite tool

A. Find the "cite" tool in an article record in EBSCO.

B. Find the "cite" tool in an article record in ProQuest.

A. In EBSCO, click on the title of an article in the results list.  The "cite" tool is found on the right side of the page that opens.  After clicking on "cite", choose a citation style to copy and paste into a reference list.

B. In ProQuest, click on the title of an article in the results list.  "Cite" is found on the right side of the page that opens. After clicking on "cite", choose a citation style to copy and paste into a reference list.

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5. Use the citation matcher

A. On the Phillips Library website "Search" page, find the search box to use a journal citation to match to an article in the Phillips Library ejournal collection.

B.  Use the citation matcher to find out if the article cited below is in the Phillips Library full-text ejournal collection.

Ní Chróinín, D., & O'Sullivan University of Limerick, M. (2016). Elementary Classroom Teachers' Beliefs Across Time: Learning to Teach Physical Education. Journal Of Teaching In Physical Education, 35(2), 97-106

C. Use the citation matcher to find out if the article cited below is in the Phillips Library full-text ejournal collection.

Syrett, M., & Lammiman, J. (2004). Advertising and millennials. Young Consumers, 5(4), 62-73.

A.  This search box is shown below.  Notice, the search is started by entering a the title of the journal that has the wanted article.  

B.  Yes. The article is in the Library's full-text ejournal collection.  Click on the database. Then, using the citation, select the year (2016), then the volume/issue to find the article.

Ní Chróinín, D., & O'Sullivan University of Limerick, M. (2016). Elementary Classroom Teachers' Beliefs Across Time: Learning to Teach Physical Education. Journal Of Teaching In Physical Education, 35(2), 97-106

C.  No. The article is NOT available in full text ejournal collection.   A librarian can help.

Syrett, M., & Lammiman, J. (2004). Advertising and millennials. Young Consumers, 5(4), 62-73. 

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