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SWK4200 Social Work Research I - Fall 2017 - Hart

What is a Scholarly, or Peer-Reviewed, Journal?

Peer Review in Three Minutes

From North Carolina State University, this is a three-minute audiovisual presentation explaining peer review.

Where to find peer-reviewed sources

Search all EBSCO databases

Tips for using the EBSCO databases:

  • Use limiters (subject terms, full-text, peer-reviewed, etc.)
  • Be sure adjust the "Publication Date" so that you are only retrieving articles from the last 10 years.
  • Save, print, or email searches, citations, or articles.
  • Consider creating an account in EBSCO (My ESBCOhost) to save research.
  • Automatically format citations in APA style.
  • Use AU username and password to access databases from off-campus.
  • Use the Find It button to see if full-text is available in another database, in print in our library, or to have emailed at no charge.

Tips for using the ProQuest databases:

  • Narrow results to peer-reviewed or by source type (scholarly journal).
  • Save, email, or searches, citations, or articles.
  • Consider creating an account in ProQuest (My Research) to save research.
  • Automatically format citations in APA style.
  • Use AU username and password to access databases from off-campus.
  • Use the SFX button to see if full-text is available in another database, in print in our library, or to have emailed at no charge.
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How to Identify an Empirically-based Article

  • Empirical means "based on, concerned with, or verifiable by observation or experience rather than theory or pure logic."
  • Empirical research is published in scholarly, peer-reviewed (or refereed) journals.
  • Empirical studies are reports of original research; they test hypotheses by presenting novel analyses of data not considered or addressed by previous research.
  • Not all articles from scholarly, peer-reviewed (or refereed) journals are empirical. In addition to empirical articles, scholarly journals sometimes publish theoretical articles, methodological articles, case studies, book reviews, or other types of articles.
  • Most empirical research includes the following sections:
    • Abstract
    • Introduction
    • Method
    • Results
    • Discussion
    • References
  • According to the Publication Manual of the APA, the Abstract is a brief, comprehensive summary of the contents of the article; it allows readers to survey the contents of an article quickly and, like a title, it enables persons interested in the document to retrieve it from abstracting and indexing databases. Most scholarly journals require an abstract.

  • The Introduction states the research question or the hypothesis and will explain the rationale for the study. A review of scholarly literature on the topic is normally included.


 

  • The Method section describes in detail how the experiment or research was designed to gather data for the study. A description of the subjects (participants) in the study is normally included as well a description of the research process.
     
  • The Results section contains the statistics and data analysis. All relevant results from the collected data are summarized and reported.

  • In the Discussion section, the authors evaluate and interpret their findings and discuss the implications of the experiment. Support or nonsupport for the original hypothesis should be stated clearly.

  • References acknowledge the work of previous scholars and provide a reliable way to locate it. ... The standard procedures for citation ensure that references are accurate, complete, and useful to investigators and readers. (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, p. 37).

 

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